Jennifer Gay Summers

The Blog

Author | Journalist | Blogger | Inspirational Speaker

ADHD and Neurodivergent Parenting Advocate

Taking Chances Pays Off for My Daughter

Summer school can pose a huge challenge to kids with ADHD. Back when Lee was a teenager and considered it, the thought of fitting a semester’s worth of learning into just a few weeks seemed like a recipe for failure. But, the trade-off of one less class in ninth grade won the day, although that meant accepting help from me, not easy for my headstrong, independent kid. In this blog I wrote for ADDitude magazine when Lee was about to start high school, we find the unexpected rewards of summer school’s challenge.

Mothers Come First

I’m so excited to have an excerpt from my memoir published this month in MER, Mom Egg Review, the Ages/Stages MER Online Folio! This is a wonderful literary journal about motherhood and all its complexities. In my essay, “Mothers Come First,” I face both the fears and...

The Journey from Diagnosis to Acceptance

The Journey from Diagnosis to Acceptance – If you have just been given your child’s mental health diagnosis, there is solid advice to guide you on your journey.

Lost in the Mall – Dorothy Parker Ashes

Thrilled to have an essay included in the current issue of Dorothy Parker’s Ashes. It’s an honor to be among so many talented writers. The theme is “Lost,” and my essay is about losing my neurodivergent child in the mall at the same time I was losing my mother to...

The Gift of Mommy Friendships

As Mother’s Day approaches, I want to thank all the special moms who supported me through the years. Parenting a neurodiverse child is challenging and makes it difficult sometimes to find understanding friends. When I was struggling, long before my child’s ADHD diagnosis, two moms stepped forward and gave me hope and the gift of friendship. This blog is in honor of them.

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Taking Chances Pays Off for My Daughter

Taking Chances Pays Off for My Daughter

Summer school can pose a huge challenge to kids with ADHD. Back when Lee was a teenager and considered it, the thought of fitting a semester’s worth of learning into just a few weeks seemed like a recipe for failure. But, the trade-off of one less class in ninth grade won the day, although that meant accepting help from me, not easy for my headstrong, independent kid. In this blog I wrote for ADDitude magazine when Lee was about to start high school, we find the unexpected rewards of summer school’s challenge.

read more
Mothers Come First

Mothers Come First

I’m so excited to have an excerpt from my memoir published this month in MER, Mom Egg Review, the Ages/Stages MER Online Folio! This is a wonderful literary journal about motherhood and all its complexities. In my essay, “Mothers Come First,” I face both the fears and...

read more
The Gift of Mommy Friendships

The Gift of Mommy Friendships

As Mother’s Day approaches, I want to thank all the special moms who supported me through the years. Parenting a neurodiverse child is challenging and makes it difficult sometimes to find understanding friends. When I was struggling, long before my child’s ADHD diagnosis, two moms stepped forward and gave me hope and the gift of friendship. This blog is in honor of them.

read more
The Power of Books

The Power of Books

Over the years in my quest to help my child with ADHD and now complete a memoir about it, I accumulated many books on the subject. Maybe it’s the teacher in me or just my passion for books, but I ended up with a pretty good collection. This month’s blog focuses on some of my favorites.

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Communicating With Your ADHD Child

Communicating With Your ADHD Child

Even though I’d heard that communication is a skill we learn and practice, no one told me how important that would be in raising my child. Between Lee’s inability to focus, a lot of hyperactivity, and emotions that were hard to regulate, it became my challenge to find a different way to communicate. In this month’s blog, I put together the tips that worked for me over the years. Hope you’ll find one that works for you!

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Situational Awareness 

Situational Awareness 

One of the workshops I loved at last year’s CHADD conference was led by Ryan Wexelblatt, the “ADHD Dude.” A popular speaker, he chose to highlight “Situational Awareness,” and it was an eye-opener. Join me in this month’s blog as I figure out how to keep Lee safe in parking lots, only to find it turned around on me many years later. And a big thanks to Ryan for his words of wisdom that motivated this blog!

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Turning Judgement into Support

Turning Judgement into Support

Recently, ADDitude magazine posted on social media one of my blogs: https://www.additudemag.com/girls-with-adhd-anxiety-spd/. In the comments, there were angry responses from people saying they’d have walked out on the conversation I had with a friend regarding my daughter’s anxiety. Here’s my response in a blog as to why anger doesn’t work for me, including five steps on how to handle other people’s judgement:

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When ADHD and Sports Don’t Mix

When ADHD and Sports Don’t Mix

This month’s blog is for those of you parents who are having trouble finding the right sport for your child with ADHD. Does your child get easily distracted right in the middle of a game? Does she have problems following the coach’s rules? Do you find yourself pleading with her to give the sport just one more chance? Follow me as I set out to find answers, only to miss the one staring me right in the face.

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Less Than Perfect

Less Than Perfect

This month’s blog is for all the moms who’ve ever felt like the world’s worst mother at one time or another. And, it’s especially for those of you struggling to parent a young child with ADHD or any other difficult challenges. Balancing your needs with those of your...

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Speak Up!

Speak Up!

For many children with ADHD, one of the most difficult skills to learn is how to self-advocate. But, it becomes critical when they go to high school and into adult life. In today’s world, where so many kids struggle with anxiety or depression, learning to advocate is a skill not to be underestimated.

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